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Puerto Rico Loses Power — Again

Puerto Rico has experienced an islandwide blackout seven months after Hurricane Maria hit the island and devastated much of its infrastructure. Every single power customer on the U.S. territory is without power, NPR's Adrian Florido reports from San Juan. More than 3 million people are affected. It's the first total blackout since Hurricane Maria. PREPA, Puerto Rico's electrical utility, says a fault was detected on a transmission line between two power plants and that service will be...

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Meet The Japanese Baseball Sensation Challenging The Notion That Pitchers Can't Hit

The Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Angels face off again Wednesday night in Anaheim, California. During Tuesday nights match-up, all eyes were on rookie pitching and batting sensation Shohei Ohtani. Some baseball writers have called the rookie the Japanese Babe Ruth and the next big thing in baseball. But Ohtani got a reality check when he was pulled from Tuesdays game early. Here & Now s Eric Westervelt ( @Ericnpr ) speaks with A Martínez  ( @AMartinezLA ), host of KPCCs Take Two . Copyright...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 7, 2014

John Husing, Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, has his regular weekly chat with KVCR's Ken Vincent.  With Congress likely headed for another showdown over raising the debt ceiling next month, Dr. Husing explains that -- even when they inevitably do agree to raise the debt limit -- these Capitol Hill fights have a negative affect on aspects of the economy, such as consumer confidence and interest rates

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 7, 2014

John Husing, Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, has his regular weekly chat with KVCR's Ken Vincent.  With Congress likely headed for another showdown over raising the debt ceiling next month, Dr. Husing explains that -- even when they inevitably do agree to raise the debt limit -- these Capitol Hill fights have a negative affect on aspects of the economy, such as consumer confidence and interest rates

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 7, 2014

John Husing, Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, has his regular weekly chat with KVCR's Ken Vincent.  With Congress likely headed for another showdown over raising the debt ceiling next month, Dr. Husing explains that -- even when they inevitably do agree to raise the debt limit -- these Capitol Hill fights have a negative affect on aspects of the economy, such as consumer confidence and interest rates

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

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Just In From NPR:

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called new presidential and parliamentary elections for June 24, more than a year earlier than scheduled. The change announced Wednesday by Erdogan speeds the implementation of the constitutional changes approved last year, which will give the president broad new powers upon completion of the next national election.

Chemical weapons inspectors still haven’t entered Douma, where the U.S., U.K. and France say the Syrian government used poison gas to kill more than 40 people on April 7. Syria and its ally Russia have repeatedly denied using chemical weapons.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with Alastair Hay, a chemical weapons specialist and professor emeritus of environmental toxicology at the University of Leeds.

Southwest pilot Tammie Jo Shults is being praised for her cool demeanor after her plane suffered a blown engine — killing one passenger — and she was forced to make a one-engine, emergency landing in Philadelphia with nearly 150 people onboard Tuesday.

In the midst of calamity, passengers on Flight 1380 used their phones to send texts to loved ones and share news of their desperate state.

The wild battle in Arkansas over dicamba, the controversial and drift-prone herbicide, just got even crazier. Local courts have told some farmers that they don't have to obey a summertime ban on dicamba spraying that the state's agricultural regulators issued last fall. The state has appealed.

More From NPR

'Shoot First, Ask Questions Later': Ronan Farrow On A Diplomacy-Less State Department

Ronan Farrow just won the Pulitzer Prize for stories he wrote for The New Yorker , but before uncovering sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein for the magazine, he worked at the State Department as a special adviser in the Obama administration. Farrow had worked for the United Nations in Sudan and then, as a young lawyer, went on to become a special adviser in the Obama administration for Afghanistan and Pakistan as well as an adviser to then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton...

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In A Puerto Rican Mountain Town, Hope Ebbs As The Hardship Continues

Helicopters from the power company buzz across the skies of this picturesque valley, ferrying electrical poles on long wires to workmen standing on steep hillsides. The people of Castañer, an isolated village in Puerto Rico's central mountains, view the repairs to the electrical grid warily. Crews have come and gone, and people living along the mountain roads don't expect to get power until late summer, if ever. Power finally started flowing to the center of town last month, but the grid...

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Inside The Ongoing Chemical Weapons Investigation In Syria

Chemical weapons inspectors still havent entered Douma, where the U.S., U.K. and France say the Syrian government used poison gas to kill more than 40 people on April 7. Syria and its ally Russia have repeatedly denied using chemical weapons. Here & Now s Lisa Mullins talks with Alastair Hay , a chemical weapons specialist and professor emeritus of environmental toxicology at the University of Leeds. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Barbara Bush On Meeting George, Motherhood And Her Signature Fake Pearls

Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday after a series of hospitalizations. She was the wife of former President George H.W. Bush and the mother of former President George W. Bush. Born Barbara Pierce in New York City, Bush initially thought she'd grow up to become a nurse. "But then I met that marvelous George Bush and the nursing went out the window," she told Fresh Air in 1994. The Bushes settled in Midland, Texas, where Barbara became a stay-at-home mother. Her husband's work often...

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Politics From NPR

Comey, Trump Exchange Harsh Words In Wake Of Book Release

Political strategists  Jamal Simmons  ( @JamalSimmons ) and  John Brabender   ( @JohnBrabender ) join Here & Now s Lisa Mullins and Eric Westervelt ( @Ericnpr ) to discuss the war of words between President Trump and former FBI director James Comey, who calls Trump morally unfit to be president in his new book out this week. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Education From NPR

100 Top Colleges Vow To Enroll More Low-Income Students

College access and affordability: It's a common topic in higher education — because college is the one place that can really be a catapult when it comes to moving up the economic ladder. And yet, research has shown that just 3 percent of high-achieving, low-income students attend America's most selective colleges. And, it's not that these students just aren't there — every year tens of thousands of top students who don't come from wealthy families never even apply to elite colleges....

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Q&A: Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez On Covering School Shootings

Behind the Stories features perspectives from the reporters, editors and producers who create NPR's content, offering insights into how and why they do what they do. For this post, we sat down with NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez to talk about his piece, "What Decades Of Covering School Shootings Has Taught Me" ? What drew you to report on education? I didn't plan on covering the education beat. I spent most of my reporting career on the U.S.-Mexico border writing about politics,...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine

Chasing A New Way To Prevent HIV: Passive Immunization

After decades of intense effort, an effective vaccine against HIV is not on the horizon — and, some say, may never be possible. So some AIDS researchers are going passive. As in passive immunization. Active immunization is what an effective vaccine does. It stimulates the recipient to make antibodies that protect against a disease. Passive immunization involves the direct injection of antibodies extracted from survivors of a particular infection. It's an old method of preventing infection...

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West And Pacific Rim From NPR

Shark Attacks Force Cancellation Of Australian Surfing Competition

Australian authorities have shut down a major international surfing event after recreational surfers were attacked by sharks near the site of the competition on the country's southwest coast. The World Surf League cancelled the remainder of this year's Margaret River Pro, which began April 11 and was to finish on Monday. The decision came after the two surfers, who were not in the competition, were mauled in separate attacks earlier this week at surf spots only a few miles from the event's...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Is Netflix On Its Way To World Domination Of Streaming?

Netflix blew past Wall Street expectations this week and added 7.4 million new subscribers between January and March — giving it a total of 125 million paying subscribers worldwide. Its popularity is leaving rivals Amazon and Hulu in the dust as it continues to add new content. But can the service that made binge watching popular keep it up as a big rival gears up to take it on? When House of Cards staring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright premiered in 2013 , it was groundbreaking TV. Big...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

Antarctic Veggies: Practice For Growing Plants On Other Planets

Last Christmas, Matthew Bamsey was in Antarctica with a giant item on his wish list. As a systems engineer at the German Aerospace Center, Bamsey was hoping the greenhouse he had helped design would arrive at Neumayer Station III, Antarctica, around Dec. 25. His gift was a bit late — icy weather delayed the greenhouse's arrival until Jan. 3, but he didn't mind. After three years of preparation, it was fine that it got there eventually. Now, the greenhouse project, called EDEN ISS , is fully...

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don't miss

3 Problems With Selling A Car In China

For decades, China has been one of the most difficult places to sell a car, and one of the most lucrative. Nearly 29 million vehicles were sold in China in 2017, according to the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers. That's 11 million more than what sold in the U.S. last year, according to Wards, an auto data tracking firm. This week, Chinese officials announced they're planning to relax some rules specifically for electric cars. Here are some of the barriers that makes selling a car...

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