california drought

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The drought is changing the size and flavor of California's fruit.  Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg explains.

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Californians are exceeding Governor Jerry Brown's 25 percent water conservation mandate.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, urban water use dropped 31 percent in July.

guardianlv.com

California is already dealing with the effects of climate change.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, scientists and policy experts are discussing how to better manage and adapt to those changes during a conference in Sacramento this week.

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The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor and forecast shows continued dry times ahead for California -- and much of the west -- through November.  Capital Public Radio's Ed Joyce reports.

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Climate change is playing a part in California's drought.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, research released yesterday [Thursday] suggests global warming is making the drought worse.

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A new report from NASA shows the San Joaquin Valley is sinking much faster than ever before.  Capital Public Radio's Ed Joyce reports.

A new UC Davis study projects the fourth year of drought in California will cost the overall economy 2.7-billion dollars.  But as Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, the study's authors say agriculture remains remarkably resilient in spite of the drought.

www.cdc.gov

California health experts are surprised that the incidence of Valley Fever has gone down during the drought.  The fungal infection is commonly spread in arid, dusty conditions.  But, even though the state is drier, the number of cases continues to drop.  Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg has more.

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Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports on the discovery of more water reserves than previously thought in California reservoirs.

Water Ruling Clears The Way For Enforcement

Aug 5, 2015
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A judge has denied a water district's request for a preliminary injunction against California water regulators. The ruling clears the way for the State Water Resources Control Board to pursue enforcement actions against districts accused of illegal water diversions. Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports.

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California has launched a website which allows residents to notify local agencies about water wasters. KVCR's Rick Dulock has more.

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Water regulators are praising Californians for reducing their water use by 27 percent in June. However, some communities still have a long way to go to meet mandatory requirements. Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports.

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The Inland Empire, along with the rest of California, is in the fourth year of sustained drought. When mandatory water cutbacks went into effect in June, the water shortage went from an inconvenience to a fact of life. Governor Jerry Brown has ordered water use to be cut eight to 36 percent from 2013 levels. While IE communities and water agencies adjust, pockets of resistance are springing up. KVCR's Matt Guilhem looks at what is - and isn't - being done around Riverside County.

Capital Public Radio

As the California drought continues, more rodents are encroaching on homes in search of water. Animal shelters throughout the state are advertising feral cats as a wise pest control alternative. Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg has more.

www.capradio.org

New state and federal funding will provide relief for farmworkers hurt by California's drought.  The U.S. Department of Labor is providing 18 million dollars and the state is providing 7.5 million.  Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg has more.

California water regulators are taking steps to stop illegal water diversions by irrigation districts with some of the oldest water rights.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, the latest action proposes the largest penalty against a water district since the drought began.

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California may be getting browner.  In a move to further conserve water, the California Water Commission voted yesterday (Wednesday) to limit grass in new construction.  Capital Public Radio's Katie Orr reports.

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It's been three months since Governor Jerry Brown ordered California communities to slash their water use by as much as 36 percent.  Some cities -- including Eureka and Arcata -- have successfully appealed those mandatory reductions. 

The Inland Empire's largest city, Riverside, was ordered to cut its water use by 28 percent.  But Riverside city officials say that's unfair, and the city has threatened to sue.  The California Report's Tena Rubio brings us the story.

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Federal climate scientists say last month was the warmest June in more than a century in California.  Capital Public Radio's Ed Joyce reports.

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Increasing the price of water encourages conservation.  But as Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, California water regulators are seeking the best way to do that without running into legal problems.

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A close review of water conservation numbers shows some urban water suppliers in California still have a long way to go to meet mandatory conservation targets.  Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports.

As the state continues through its worst drought in history, Californians stepped up their water conservation in May.  Capital Public Radio's Ed Joyce reports.

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A California Assembly committee will hear a bill today (Wednesday) that would allow water districts to impose sizeable taxes on any business, industry, or person who wastes water.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, the measure would require voter approval.

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When it rains in California, millions of gallons of water run down city streets, into storm drains, and out into the Pacific Ocean.  But with the state in its fourth year of drought, it can't afford to waste it.  Some cities are capturing that rain by soaking it up like a sponge.  Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports son what may be California's next big untapped water supply.

ucanr.edu

California's drought has killed so many trees that the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection is adopting emergency regulations to remove them.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, the board is concerned about the growing threat of wildfires.

How The Drought Is Changing Agriculture In California

Jun 22, 2015
Lesley McClurg, Capital Public Radio

Water scarcity is driving farmers to plant different crops.  Growers are switching to more profitable and less thristy fruits, vegetables, and nuts.  Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg reports on how the drought is changing agriculture in California.

californiawaterblog.com

Late-emerging legislation designed to deal with the drought could be part of the budget package California lawmakers will vote on today.  But as Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, water agencies say the state is overstepping its authority with some of the provisions in the proposal.

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The California Department of Water Resources has proposed changes to an ordinance that would prohibit installing grass at most new commercial and residential properties.  Capital Public Radio's Ed Joyce reports.

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For the first time in nearly 40 years, California regulators have ordered some of the oldest water rights holders to stop diverting water from rivers and streams.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, the move affects hundreds of farmers and communities. 

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The drought in California has killed millions of trees in the southern Sierra Nevada.  But the problem is more widespread.  As Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports, some ecologists say the state could lose some of its iconic trees.

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