Lars Gotrich

According to Carly Rae Jepsen's new video for "Cut To The Feeling," Carly Rae Jepsen is really good at making coffee, because Carly Rae Jepsen is the queen of everything.

At this point, you're either with Converge or against it. Nearly 25 years after its debut album, the band's cyclonic buzzsaw is unmistakable — this is hardcore-fueled extreme music that simultaneously elevates and destroys; pity to those who don't experience an epiphany in the pit.

It's Bastille Day in France, so what better way to celebrate 1789's violent overthrow of the monarchy than with some French house music — désolé, musique de maison -- arranged for a marching band?

Beyonce's year-end favorite, life-encompassing Lemonade will be thoroughly documented in a $300 collector's edition How To Make Lemonade box set. It will feature the album as a double-LP, with additional audio and visual downloads — oh, and a 600-page coffee table book with behind-the-scenes photos, a foreword written by Dr.

Tell me if you've heard this one before: Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie walk into a studio... and actually make a record together. Fleetwood Mac's drama-filled history is the stuff of a "great play," to say the least.

Calvin Harris has a habit of making ubiquitous summer jams.

We stayed up late, damaged our ear sockets and gave into the ecstasy of live music at SXSW: Diet Cig, Lizzo, Moor Mother, Sleigh Bells, S U R V I V E, Anna Meredith, Weezer, The Revolution's Prince tribute — even Garth Brooks. Here are 50 photos from the festival shot by Adam Kissick, with a few by our own Bob Boilen.

Bless the salon, for it is a holy place of renewal and tiny dogs. For "We Should Be Friends" off last year's excellent The Weight Of These Wings, Miranda Lambert hits up Wanda's House of Beauty to get her hair done and, perhaps in a nod to Legally Blonde, give her some life.

M.I.A. still does not want to be your pop icon, thank you very much. Over a hyper-cut sample of "Blue Moon" by The Marcels, she sings, "I'm not Rihanna / I'm not Madonna / I'm not Mariah, or Ariana."

Well, you can't deny the title. Blondie has announced its 11th album, Pollinator, with lead single "Fun," a disco-heavy new wave track that recalls the Blondie of yesteryear, which was written by TV On The Radio's Dave Sitek.

After much criticism around last year's round of '70s rockers and no women, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame announced its nominees for the class of 2017 this morning, which include first-time nominees Tupac Shakur, Pearl Jam, Bad Brains, Joan Baez and Depeche Mode.

What does a new album from The Rolling Stones sound like in 2016? If "Just A Fool" is any indication, it's a lot like the band's earliest recordings from more than 50 years ago. This cover of a Buddy Johnson and His Orchestra tune is the kind of harmonica-honked, barroom piano-plonked, dirty blues that introduced the world to the Stones, when the British band made a name for itself by interpreting American blues songs.

When listeners aren't writing to NPR to comment on a story, they mostly just want to know what music was played between segments. We call those buttons or breaks or deadrolls, and they give a breath after reporting a tragedy, lighten the mood after you most definitely cried during StoryCorps, or seize a moment to be ridiculously cheeky. How could you not play Katy Perry's "Hot N Cold" following a story about why women shiver in the office?

Ilyas Ahmed, 'Come On'

Feb 18, 2015

Ilyas Ahmed's music has always felt like a shadow. Since 2005, the Pakistani-born, Portland-based musician has cloaked his albums in a ghostly atmosphere that's at once warming and unsettling. His first new record in three years, I Am All Your Own, doesn't lose that spirit, but does lift Ahmed's lilting tenor and falsetto above the fog.

How do you handle a breakup? Get a new haircut? How about a tattoo? Get sloshed? Crash some hippies' coffeehouse show with a rip-roaring guitar solo? Kill a man? All options are on the table as Summer Cannibals singer-guitarist Jessica Boudreaux drinks and fights her way through the night in "Something New," directed by Whitey McConnaughy.

In the land grab that was the early '90s Seattle grunge scene, TAD was the hard rock band caught up in the groundswell. And how could you miss them? Bummer melodies cloaked in giant riffs, a juvenile sense of humor (see: God's Balls, 8-Way Santa) and the larger-than-life frontman Tad Doyle. More than most of their peers, the band made records that hold up even if major labels dropped them left and right. Six years in the making, Doyle returns triumphant with Brothers of the Sonic Cloth and one of the most satisfying and heaviest doom metal records in years.