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Trump Signs Order To End Family Separations

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday to end his controversial policy that has resulted in thousands of family separations and brought criticism from Democrats and Republicans. "We're going to keep families together but we still have to maintain toughness or our country will be overrun by people, by crime, by all of the things that we don't stand for and that we don't want," Trump said Wednesday morning, when he announced that he would sign the order....

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What We Know: Family Separation And 'Zero Tolerance' At The Border

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry. On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but...

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Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

State Can't Stop Blue Shield Rate Hikes

Jan 9, 2014

California's Insurance Commissioner has deemed a Blue Shield hike in premiums as "excessive." However, there's little the state can do about it. KVCR's Mindi McNeil reports

State Can't Stop Blue Shield Rate Hikes

Jan 9, 2014

California's Insurance Commissioner has deemed a Blue Shield hike in premiums as "excessive." However, there's little the state can do about it. KVCR's Mindi McNeil reports

State Can't Stop Blue Shield Rate Hikes

Jan 9, 2014

California's Insurance Commissioner has deemed a Blue Shield hike in premiums as "excessive." However, there's little the state can do about it. KVCR's Mindi McNeil reports

One of the biggest, more prestigious film festivals in North American is an hour's drive from the Inland Empire... and we don't mean an hour's drive west to Los Angeles

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Just In From NPR:

The National Park Service has approved an initial request for organizers to hold a second "Unite the Right" rally, this time across from the White House in August — one year after white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Va.

"The Gorilla Foundation is sad to announce the passing of our beloved Koko," the famous research center says, informing the world of the death of a gorilla who fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility for language.

New Zealand's Prime Minister Gives Birth

2 hours ago

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern had a baby girl on Thursday, becoming the first sitting world leader to give birth in nearly three decades. The last head of state to give birth while in power was Benazir Bhutto, who had her second child in 1990, while prime minister of Pakistan.

A Canadian mining firm says it will move forward with plans to mine minerals from land that was previously part of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah.

More From NPR

Pope Joins Calls To End Family Separations, Says He Stands 'With Refugees'

Pope Francis has added his voice to the growing chorus of those decrying the Trump administration's " zero-tolerance " policy on illegal border crossings that has resulted in the separation of parents and children traveling together. "A person's dignity does not depend on them being a citizen, a migrant, or a refugee," the pope tweeted Wednesday with the hashtag #WithRefugees. "Saving the life of someone fleeing war and poverty is an act of humanity." In another tweet , the pope said Jesus is...

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Big Banks Are Once Again Taking Risks With Complex Financial Trades, Report Says

Big banks are skirting the rules on the sale of the complex financial instruments that helped bring about the 2008 financial crisis, by exploiting a loophole in federal banking regulations, a new report says . The loophole could leave Wall Street exposed to big losses, potentially requiring taxpayers to once again bail out the biggest banks, warns the report's author, Michael Greenberger, former director of trading and markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. "We've seen this...

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Charleston, Key Port For Slaves In America, Apologizes And Meditates On Racism Today

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vman6fk8GA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vman6fk8GA Charleston, S.C., has formally denounced slavery and apologized for the port city's role in that evil institution. The City Council voted 7-5 to condemn the industry that had long thrived in Charleston — the entry point for nearly half the slaves who were brought from Africa to the U.S. A capacity crowd gathered to comment and to witness the council's vote Tuesday, which followed a number of speeches on...

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Canada Is Fertile Ground For The Global Marijuana Industry

Canada has become the first industrialized country in the world to legalize recreational marijuana , unlocking a market that could be worth billions of dollars. On Tuesday, the Canadian Senate approved the Cannabis Act , which allows adults to use the drug coast to coast. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged the historic decision on Twitter. It’s been too easy for our kids to get marijuana and for criminals to reap the profits. Today, we change that. Our plan to legalize & regulate...

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Rescuers Search For At Least 180 Missing After Ferry Sinks In Indonesia

Search operations are underway for at least 180 people missing after a ferry capsized late Monday afternoon in Lake Toba on Sumatra Island, during Eid al-Fitr, a Muslim holiday which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Millions of people travel home for the holiday, and the lake is crowded with boats during this time of year. A search and rescue team, including divers and drones, is scouring the lake's depths, looking for those who were on board the ferry when it sank. Rescuers say...

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Politics From NPR

It's Easier To Call A Fact A Fact When It's One You Like, Study Finds

Study after study has found that partisan beliefs and bias shape what we believe is factually true . Now the Pew Research Center has released a new study that takes a step back. They wondered: How good are Americans at telling a factual statement from an opinion statement — if they don't have to acknowledge the factual statement is true ? By factual, Pew meant an assertion that could be proven or disproven by evidence. All the factual statements used in the study were true, to keep the...

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West And Pacific Rim From NPR

Google's Diversity Problems Reflect Silicon Valley

Google is losing its black and Latino workers at higher rates than any other demographic, according to the companys annual diversity report released last week. After years of promises to diversify, the company remains largely white and male. But it is far from alone throughout Silicon Valley. Here & Now s Femi Oke speaks with Rani Molla ( @ranimolla ), data editor for Recode, about the numbers. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

The Science Behind The World Cup Ball

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_t-z8BXQ6o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmGAmJ-B6_o Each World Cup, the sportswear giant Adidas designs an official ball to be used in the tournament. And small changes in the design can create significant differences in how the ball responds during play. "It's an interesting phenomena that the world's most popular sporting event for the world's most popular sport and the most important piece of equipment in that sport is changed every World Cup," says John...

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Education From NPR

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

Every year, many students who have overcome daunting obstacles in high school receive good news — they've been accepted to college. These kids represent a success story: through hard work and determination, they've made it into college, and perhaps even on to a better life. Except it doesn't always work out that way. "The rate with which kids who are college-intending do not actually get to college in the fall is surprisingly high," says Lindsay Page , an education researcher at the...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Jose Feliciano Hosts Naturalization Ceremony, Performs National Anthem

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQkY2UFBUb4 Funny what the passage of 50 years will do to a controversy. In 1968, 23-year-old Jose Feliciano was riding high on the pop charts when he was asked to sing the national anthem at the World Series in Detroit. In retrospect, it was nothing controversial. But in 1968, his bluesy, folk version of "The Star-Spangled Banner" ruffled a lot of traditionalists who considered it to be unpatriotic. It even caused some radio stations to stop playing his songs....

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Fonsi Goes Grime (Sort Of) And Daddy Yankee Goes Old-School

Friends, a lot happened over the weekend. On Friday, Luis Fonsi proved once again that he can get millions of views with a well-drawled ayyyyy on any given beach in Puerto Rico; this time, he got an unexpected assist from U.K. grime star Stefflon Don. On Saturday, Daddy Yankee recruited the recently reunited old-school duo R.K.M. and Ken-Y for another go at it, now that reggaeton seems to (finally) be having its mainstream moment. Also on this week's playlist: Puerto Rican synth-pop band Los...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing Nutrients

Plants need carbon dioxide to live, but its effects on them are complicated. As the level of carbon dioxide in the air continues to rise because of human activity, scientists are trying to pin down how the plants we eat are being affected. Mounting evidence suggests that many key plants lose nutritional value at higher CO 2 levels, and scientists are running experiments all over the world to try to tease out the effects. Rows of controlled chambers that look kind of like industrial...

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don't miss:

Watch This 8-Year-Old Girl Crush Led Zeppelin's 'Good Times Bad Times'

Eight-year-old Yoyoka Soma's favorite drummer is John Bonham, so for her entry into the 2018 Hit Like A Girl drum contest, she covered Bonham's part on Led Zeppelin's "Good Times Bad Times." The video, which features Soma playing along to the 1969 hit , earned her a spot in the international competition's final round. She didn't take home the gold, but she did win our hearts. She absolutely smashes through the song with three foot pedals and polka dot socks putting in bass work. She's even...

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Collaborative Journalism: NPR and Member Stations Working Together to Cover America

Every day, NPR and Member stations are working together to tell the story of the whole country from everywhere in the country. Why Journalism Matters. Good information about where you live — your town, your region, your country — is a foundation of our democracy. But it's harder to get. Why NPR and local stations. Public media can address these gaps and create a more civil, more connected society. No other news organization has the kind of on-the-ground reach of public radio. We are...

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