Summer Campaign

SPLASH INTO SUMMER!

Keep trusted news as part of your daily routine. Help us reach our $21,000 goal. Your donation enters you automatically into the Grand Prize Drawing for Medieval Times. Call 877-512-8843 or Give Now!

Trump Administration Holds Course As Opposition Builds To Family Separation Policy

President Trump blames Democrats for an administration policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. Critics say hes using an old law to try to force border security legislation,  and many other Republicans have continued to voice their opposition to the policy . NPR congressional correspondent  Scott Detrow  ( @scottdetrow ) speaks with  Here & Now s Robin Young about how Congress and others have reacted to the controversy. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http:...

Read More

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

Pages

Just In From NPR:

Just outside tiny Sheffield, Iowa, a modern steel and glass office building has sprung up next to a corn field. Behind it, there's a plant that employs almost 700 workers making Sukup brand steel grain bins. The factory provides an economic anchor for Sheffield, population 1,125.

Charles Sukup, the company's president, says even though workers can be hard to come by, there are no plans to relocate.

"Our philosophy is you bloom where you're planted," Sukup says with a smile.

For most of her childhood, growing up in southeastern Pennsylvania, Kelly Zimmerman felt alone and anxious.

She despaired when her mother was depressed or working late shifts; when her parents fought nonstop; when her friends wanted to come over, and she felt too ashamed to let them see her home's buckling floor, the lack of running water.

Kelly tried to shut out those feelings, and when she was 18, a boyfriend offered her an opioid painkiller — Percocet.

Her anxiety dissolved, at least for a little while.

Plants need carbon dioxide to live. But its effects on them are complicated.

As the level of carbon dioxide in the air continues to rise because of climate change, scientists are trying to pin down how the plants we eat are being impacted.

Mounting evidence suggests that many key plants lose nutritional value at higher CO2 levels, and scientists are running experiments all over the world to try to tease out the effects.

Our Take A Number series is exploring problems around the world through the lens of a single number.

Some high school students think of applying to colleges as a full-time job. There are essays and tests, loads of financial documents to assemble and calculations to make. After all that, of course, comes a big decision — one of the biggest of their young lives.

For top students who come from low-income families, the challenge is particularly difficult.

More From NPR

Supreme Court Leaves 'Wild West' Of Partisan Gerrymandering In Place — For Now

The U.S. Supreme Court punted Monday on its biggest decision of its term so far. The justices had been expected to rule on the limits of partisan gerrymandering. Instead, the court sidestepped the major issues on technical grounds, sending the issue back to the lower courts for further examination. The two cases before the court illustrate the bare-knuckles practice both parties have used to maximize and perpetuate their own power through the re-drawing of legislative district lines. In...

Read More

Magnitude 6.1 Quake Strikes Japan, Killing 4, Injuring Hundreds

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET A magnitude 6.1 earthquake rocked the Osaka region of western Japan on Monday morning, killing at least four people and injuring more than 350 others, NHK reported . The temblor struck shortly after 8 a.m. local time, causing severe damage to roads, bursting water mains and setting fires across the prefecture. The Japanese news agency reported government officials confirmed at least two people died under toppling walls. One was a 9-year-old girl who was crushed by a...

Read More

West And Pacific Rim From NPR

New 'LA Times' Owner Wants To Compete With 'New York Times' And 'Washington Post'

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong took ownership of the Los Angeles Times in style with a full-page note to his readers and his new employees on Sunday. Soon-Shiong bought the newspaper from its former corporate owners, the Chicago-based Tronc newspaper company. NPR spoke to Soon-Shiong about his ambitions for the newspaper. "I've not gone into this transaction from a financial basis at all. There's an opportunity to make a major impact on the nation," Soon-Shiong said. " LA...

Read More

Politics From NPR

With 'America First,' Trump Challenges The World Constructed After World War II

When World War II ended in August 1945, President Harry Truman was a man in a hurry.

In the final few months of that year, he pushed hard to help establish the United Nations to handle international political disputes, and the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to deal with the shattered global economy. "He knew the United States was going to have to do a lot, but that the United States couldn't do it all," said Elizabeth Spalding , a biographer of Truman who teaches...

Read More

Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

Rita Adele Steyn's mother had a double mastectomy in her 40s because she had so many lumps in her breasts. Her first cousin died of breast cancer. And Steyn's sister is going through chemotherapy for the disease now. Steyn worries she might be next. "Sometimes you feel like you beat the odds. And sometimes you feel like the odds are against you," said Steyn, 42, who lives in Tampa, Fla. "And right now I feel like the odds are against me." So Steyn jumped at the chance when she heard about a...

Read More

Education From NPR

'Cutting Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3-TWRA-g2U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h32ocoL_fb8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVp295htBVI Some parents see it coming. Natalie was not that kind of parent. Even after the director and a teacher at her older son's day care sat her down one afternoon in 2011 to detail the 3-year-old's difficulty socializing and his tendency to chatter endlessly about topics his peers showed no interest in, she still didn't get the message. Her son, the two educators...

Read More

Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

Beyoncé And Jay-Z's Surprise Album Is Here: Listen To 'Everything Is Love'

Please note : The album below contains explicit language. Just when it seemed June couldn't get any hotter for lovers of rap and R&B, the inevitable has finally happened: After a collaboration built on musical legacy and love for the past 15 years, Beyonce and Jay-Z have released a joint album as The Carters. The surprise LP, Everything Is Love , premiered Saturday afternoon exclusively on Tidal, the digital streaming platform owned in part by Jay-Z, but appeared on Spotify on Monday morning....

Read More

'You Just Serve As Much As You Can': Mj Rodriguez On Ball Culture And 'Pose'

High fashion, makeup, vogueing competitions. In the 1980s, New York City's drag balls were cultural events for the LGBTQ community, most of them black and Latino. But balls have largely been hidden from mainstream America. Now, a new show on FX is putting them front and center. It's called Pose , and according to FX , it has largest cast of transgender actors in series regular roles. "It's great that finally our stories are getting to be told from the lenses of our eyes," says transgender...

Read More

Have We Reached Peak Funny?

Ken Jennings — yep, you got it: affable Jeopardy! champ/trivia doyen/comedy-adjacent media personality, that Ken Jennings — is worried. Worried , not panicked. Not even distressed , really. No, what his book Planet Funny: How Comedy Took Over our Culture amounts to, really, is an extended, engaging, deeply knowledgeable, 275-page-long (312, if you count the endnotes) (come on, you knew there'd be endnotes) fret. He's concerned , Jennings is, about how something he loves — comedy — has...

Read More

Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

'The Secret Life of Cows' Aims To Show Animals As Thinking, Feeling Beings

A slim mahogany-colored cow, Dolly was an attentive mother to her first four offspring, all boys, at Kite's Nest farm in Worcestershire, England. Then Dolly II, a pale-colored girl, was born and became the recipient of that bovine love. In The Secret Life of Cows , published this week in the U.S. by Penguin Press, farmer Rosamund Young tells the story of what happened when Dolly II grew up and gave birth herself. Dolly II's calf was born dead and her womb was displaced in the process,...

Read More

don't miss:

We're Making Too Many Mistakes; We Must Start CQ'ing

You've hopefully heard about the meetings we've been having regarding the mistakes we've been making. If you haven't been to one of the discussions yet, watch for an invitation. As has been said many times at the sessions so far, it's important upfront to acknowledge that we're doing more good work — but without more good people. Almost everyone is stretched. Thanks are in order for all that you do. But, then there's this: We've posted about 100 corrections a month this year. There is no...

Read More

Watch This 8-Year-Old Girl Crush Led Zeppelin's 'Good Times Bad Times'

Eight-year-old Yoyoka Soma's favorite drummer is John Bonham, so for her entry into the 2018 Hit Like A Girl drum contest, she covered Bonham's part on Led Zeppelin's "Good Times Bad Times." The video, which features Soma playing along to the 1969 hit , earned her a spot in the international competition's final round. She didn't take home the gold, but she did win our hearts. She absolutely smashes through the song with three foot pedals and polka dot socks putting in bass work. She's even...

Read More