Famed Vegas Casinos Could Be Hobbled As Thousands Of Workers Authorize Strike

Tourism helps keep the wheel of Las Vegas' economy spinning , but a hitch could slow the spokes as tens of thousands of hospitality workers are preparing to strike as early as next month. The Culinary Workers Union, Nevada's largest labor organization, voted Tuesday to authorize a citywide strike for 50,000 members once their contracts expire June 1 — if their demands are not met. About 25,000 members weighed in on the measure, with 99 percent approving a walkout, according to the union. The...

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Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

"Addams Family" Comes to Riverside's Fox Theatre

Dec 11, 2013

KVCR's Ken Vincent talks with actor Blaire Anderson, one of the performers in the touring Broadway production of the stage musical, "The Addams Family," playing one night only, Thursday, Dec. 12, at the historic Fox Theatre in downtown Riverside.

David Fleming in conversation with Stray Cat Lee Rocker performing at the Historic Hemet Theatre. John Sheldon speaks to us about Through Wonderland at Crafton Hills. Also, Ron Berglass speaks with Paul Jacques about some seasonal theatre in the area. Ron also speaks with Alayna Via, director of the Citrus Valley High School performing arts department. 

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Just In From NPR:

It took more than 280 characters, but a federal judge in Manhattan ruled Wednesday that President Trump and his aides cannot block critics from seeing his Twitter account simply because they had posted caustic replies to his tweets in the past.

Every year, Gallup ranks U.S. cities for well-being, based on how residents feel about living in their communities, and their health, finances, social ties and sense of purpose. Perhaps unsurprisingly, places like Naples, Fla., and Boulder, Col., tend to top the list, while Southern and Midwestern towns including Canton, Ohio, and Fort Smith, Ark., often come in last. But what hard data underpin the differences between these communities?

Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story that originally ran on May 25, 2017.

May 24 is Red Nose Day in the United States.

Sometimes 11-year-old B. comes home from school in tears. Maybe she was taunted about her weight that day, called "ugly." Or her so-called friends blocked her on their phones. Some nights she is too anxious to sleep alone and climbs into her mother's bed. It's just the two of them at home, ever since her father was deported back to West Africa when she was a toddler.

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Primary Takeaways: Voters Send Parties Further Apart

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ABRz_epvic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q1cfjh6VfE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcjG2fK7kNk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NitnQZP_l3E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOVBJTaJnX0 It was a big night Tuesday for Democratic women again , from Georgia to Kentucky to Texas. It was also a big night for change on the Democratic side, even if the internecine party fight between progressives and the establishment fizzled. To sift through the results of Tuesday...

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Trump Intensifies Push On What He Calls Improper Snooping With 'Spygate' Brand

Updated at 2:12 p.m. ET President Trump intensified his attack on federal law enforcement as he sought to strengthen his case that the FBI's investigation into whether his campaign conspired with Russia actually amounted to unlawful political snooping. "I hope it's not so, but if it is, there's never been anything like it in the history of our country," the president said Wednesday. He told reporters before boarding Marine One that he didn't believe he was undercutting the FBI as he charged...

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In Wake Of Sante Fe Shooting, Texas Considers School Safety And Guns

By the end of this week, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says he plans to have hosted three roundtable discussions in response to last Fridays school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. The one Wednesday will focus on gun regulation and mental health. As KUTs Mose Buchele  ( @MoseBuchele ) reports, the first discussion  centered on school and community safety. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Dodd-Frank Rollback 'Completely Ignores' How Financial System Works, Author Says

President Trump said on Twitter on Wednesday that hes going to sign into law big changes to the Dodd-Frank banking regulations put in place after the financial crisis. The bill passed the House late Tuesday , with supporters saying it would make it easier for midsize and regional banks to lend. It already passed the Senate in March. Opponents of the move warn rolling back financial regulations could pave the way for a repeat of 2008. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with financial journalist...

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To Quell Growing Rebellion, House GOP Leaders Promise Action On Immigration In June

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET House GOP leaders promised Republicans Tuesday they will bring up immigration legislation in June, even though that pledge threatens to divide the party and undermine the staying power of House Speaker Paul Ryan. "What we're trying to do is find where the consensus sweet spot is," Ryan told reporters. "It's a very difficult issue. Immigration is an issue that has a lot of passionate positions, a lot of passionate thoughts, and our members come from various different...

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China Cuts Tariffs On Autos, Possibly Easing Trade Tensions With U.S.

Updated at 3:18 p.m. ET China is cutting tariffs on vehicles from the U.S., but the biggest benefits could go to German automakers — and Tesla, the American electric-car maker. Chinese President Xi Jinping signaled in a speech last month that the tariff cut would be coming. The foreign ministry confirmed it Tuesday: Tariffs will drop from 25 percent to 15 percent for imported cars. Tariffs on imported auto parts will fall to six percent. U.S. manufacturers and policymakers have been arguing...

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West And Pacific Rim From NPR

Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gB8ownuEtWg For the first time, scientists have videotaped sharks traveling a 500-mile-long "shark highway" in the Pacific, and they plan to turn it into a protected wildlife corridor in the ocean. Biologists have been attaching electronic tags to sharks near Costa Rica for years. They knew the sharks sometimes traveled south to the Galapagos Islands, but they'd never actually witnessed it. And they needed scientific — and visual — evidence to make their case...

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Education From NPR

20 Years Ago, Oregon School Shooting Ended A Bloody Season

Almost a year before the shooting at Columbine High School, a teenage boy wearing a trench coat walked into the Thurston High School cafeteria in Springfield, Ore. and began shooting at his fellow students. The shooter that day, May 21, 1998, was 15-year-old Kipland Kinkel. He was armed with more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition, along with two pistols when he started firing his father's Ruger .22 caliber rifle. Kinkel killed two students at Thurston and wounded 25 others. Later, police found...

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Science, Technology, And Medicine From NPR

House Passes 'Right-To-Try' Bill For Experimental Drugs

Legislation that would allow terminally ill patients to get access to experimental drugs is headed to the president's desk. The House on Tuesday passed a "right-to-try" bill that was approved by the Senate in 2017. "People who are terminally ill should not have to go from country to country to find a cure," said Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, on the House floor Tuesday. The bill, which President Trump is expected to sign, has patient advocates divided. Patient groups including the American...

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arts, culture, and media from npr

American Novelist Philip Roth, Author Of 'Portnoy's Complaint,' Dies At 85

Updated at 12:50 a.m. ET Philip Roth, whose novel American Pastoral won a Pulitzer in 1998 but who was best-known for the controversial and explicit 1969 Portnoy's Complaint , has died at age 85. Roth's biographer Blake Bailey, who confirmed his death to NPR, says the author was surrounded by friends and family. Roth was born in Newark, N.J., on March 19, 1933, and began a literary career in college. After briefly attending Rutgers University, he went to Bucknell University, where he started...

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'Roseanne' Reboot Wraps A Bait-And-Switch First Season

Now that ABC's Roseanne reboot has wrapped up its unexpectedly successful nine-episode run, it's worth asking a simple question: What just happened? What didn't happen was what some pundits feared when the show debuted: ABC positioning a hit TV show to embrace and normalize what they believe are the worst aspects of Donald Trump's ideology. Instead, star Roseanne Barr used her personal support for the president and the character's admission she voted for Trump to pull off the TV season's most...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

Missouri May Be First State To Get Serious About The Definition Of Meat

Missouri is at the vanguard of defining what meat is, thanks to legislation awaiting the governor's signature. It's an essential, perhaps even existential, question sparked by the growth of plant-based proteins, meat substitutes and lab-grown products. And it's a topic that, while first passed at the state level on May 17, is also being considered at the federal level. Under the bill, which had overwhelming bipartisan support, only products that come from once-living, breathing animals can be...

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Judge Backs N.Y. Parents, Saying Their 30-Year-Old Son Must Move Out

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SA83KYq8x6A The promise of adventure didn't do it. Neither did the lure of independence, or the weight of his 30 years. Instead, it took a judge to pry Michael Rotondo from his parents' home. The couple won an eviction order against their son after a judge argued with Rotondo for 30 minutes. "I don't see why they can't just, you know, wait a little bit for me to leave the house," Rotondo told Justice Donald Greenwood of New York's Supreme Court. "You say you're...

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