Bomb Blast Inside Mosque Kills At Least 14 In Eastern Afghanistan

A bombing inside a mosque in eastern Afghanistan on Sunday killed at least 14 people and wounded dozens more, Afghan officials said. The blast took place during afternoon prayers at the mosque in the city of Khost, the capital of the province of the same name. The mosque was also being used as a voter registration center for parliamentary elections set for October, marking the latest in a series of attacks on election-related facilities. The explosion is believed to be caused by explosives...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

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Just In From NPR:

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET

Russian President Vladimir Putin took the oath of office for a fourth term as president – solidifying his place as the country's longest-serving leader since Communist dictator Josef Stalin. Putin easily won re-election in March after his chief opponent was disqualified.

The elaborate Kremlin ceremony took place at the Grand Kremlin Palace at noon Moscow time.

A few months ago, Kourtnaye Sturgeon helped save someone's life. She was driving in downtown Indianapolis when she saw people gathered around a car on the side of the road. Sturgeon pulled over and a man told her there was nothing she could do: Two men had overdosed on opioids and appeared to be dead.

"I kind of recall saying, 'No man, I've got Narcan,' " she says, referring to the brand- name version of the opioid overdose antidote, naloxone. "Which sounds so silly, but I'm pretty sure that's what came out."

Lyme disease was once unheard of in western Pennsylvania, where Barbara Thorne, now an entomologist at the University of Maryland, spent time as a kid.

Thorne knew that if black-legged ticks are infected with bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, they can transmit Lyme to people and, that if untreated, symptoms can range from fever, fatigue and a rash, to serious damage to the joints, heart and nervous system.

Rich Cordray steps into the Laborers Local 574 hall in central Ohio. The hall is small – a dot of blue voters in the sea of red that is rural Ohio. Cordray was expected to be the unbeatable candidate in Tuesday's Ohio Democratic gubernatorial primary.

The former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has name recognition and Democratic street cred for once being dissed by President Trump.

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Surfers Head Inland To Compete On Machine-Made California Waves

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The Russia Investigations: Will Trump Give Mueller The Stiff Arm?

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As Karl Marx Turns 200, Visitors Pay Respect — And A Fee — At Tomb Site

On Saturday afternoon, Nushi Nazemi marked the 200th anniversary of Karl Marx's birth by laying a wreath at his London tomb. Nazemi, 67, grew up in a Marxist family in Tehran and served time in prison in Iran for her communist involvement against the Islamic regime. And to honor the philosopher behind the anti-capitalist activism of her youth, she paid 4 pounds (about $5.40) to enter the Highgate Cemetery. "I am OK with it," Nazemi said, regarding the admission fee. "For keeping the...

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Episode 839: The Indicator Goes To California

California is the largest U.S. state economy, and it's also one of the largest economies in the world. It's home to tons of agricultural production and to the country's biggest ports. Last month, Planet Money's Indicator team went to California to take a look at the state's money-making and not-so-money-making industries. Today on the show: We visit a celery farm facing a labor drought, a metro station at the heart of the state's housing crisis, and the Port of Long Beach, where we may or may...

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Sen. John McCain Reads From His Forthcoming Memoir, 'The Restless Wave'

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This week in our roundup, we travel from Arizona to the United Kingdom to the Philippines to bring you the education news. Teachers in Arizona head back to class The weeklong Arizona teachers walkout ended Thursday after lawmakers passed a state budget that included raising their pay. Still, not all of their demands have been met, and some vowed to keep organizing through the November elections. This was the fifth state that has seen teacher action since February. Our NPR/Ipsos poll found...

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Telemedicine Takes Transgender Care Beyond The City

At an outpatient lab in Tifton, Ga., where Karen Williams gets her blood drawn, a clerk looked from her computer screen to Williams' printed lab order, then back again. "This is not right," the clerk said, squinting at the lab order. There, the birthdate and address matched the ones on the screen, but the name displayed was a male one. A transgender woman, Williams lived as a man for nearly 50 years before beginning to make physical changes several years ago. She's grown out her hair and has...

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Donald Glover Brings His Black Renaissance To 'Saturday Night Live'

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