Inland Empire Lawmaker's Legislation Moves Forward

California Bill Would Mandate On-Campus Access To Abortion Pills

In California, the state Senate is considering legislation that would ensure that students at four-year public universities in California have access on campus to medication for abortions. Sen. Connie Leyva introduced the bill, SB 320 , in February 2017. It would require all health centers within the University of California and California State University systems to stock the drugs prescribed for medication abortion and ready their campus health clinics to provide them by 2022. Medication...

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San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Debate

Jan 9, 2014

The two finalists running for Mayor of San Bernardino faced off at a League of Women Voters forum this week. KVCR's Matt Guilhem was there, and has this report.

State Can't Stop Blue Shield Rate Hikes

Jan 9, 2014

California's Insurance Commissioner has deemed a Blue Shield hike in premiums as "excessive." However, there's little the state can do about it. KVCR's Mindi McNeil reports

State Can't Stop Blue Shield Rate Hikes

Jan 9, 2014

California's Insurance Commissioner has deemed a Blue Shield hike in premiums as "excessive." However, there's little the state can do about it. KVCR's Mindi McNeil reports

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Science, Technology, And Medicine

E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

Kids who vape and use other forms of e-cigarettes are likely to try more harmful tobacco products like regular cigarettes, but e-cigarettes do hold some promise for helping adults quit. That's according to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine , which published a comprehensive public health review of more than 800 studies on e-cigarettes on Tuesday. "There is conclusive evidence that most products emit a variety of potentially toxic substances. However the number and...

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