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'Imminent' Dam Failure Threatens Thousands In Puerto Rico

Officials continued to urge tens of thousands of people living downstream from a precarious, slowly failing dam in northwestern Puerto Rico to evacuate Saturday. But the U.S. territory's severely compromised communications infrastructure meant it was not immediately clear how successful the warnings would be. The National Weather Service said in an alert Saturday that "dam operators continued to report the threat of a failure of the Guajataca Dam, potentially causing life-threatening flash...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

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