Manchester Concert Bombing: What We Know Tuesday

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET A bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, has killed 22 people and injured 59 more, police say. Monday night's concert had drawn thousands of children and young people — many of whom were trying to leave when the blast hit. Authorities say it was a terrorist attack, carried out by a man who died at Manchester Arena. Into Tuesday morning, parents were still trying to determine the status of their loved ones who were at the show. From...

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Watch Live: House Intelligence Hearing With John Brennan

Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies Tuesday — on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and Russia's use of "active measures" — before the House Intelligence Committee. Brennan is also expected to be questioned about the many leaks regarding national security issues since President Trump took office. Brennan led the CIA during the Obama administration from 2013-2017. Prior to that, Brennan was a top counterterrorism and homeland security adviser to President Barack Obama....

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Polly Frost: She MIGHT be near you soon!

Apr 23, 2012

I was first able to interview Polly Frost for her one-woman show, "How to Survive Your Adult Relationship With Your Family" at The Canyon Crest Winery in Riverside. Before she contacted me - I must admit - I thought her name was a bit familiar - but I didn't quite know who she was. I shoulda - given my interests - and now I'm glad I DO.

Rockabilly - at age 73!

Apr 17, 2012

Wanda Jackson is called The Queen of Rock n’ Roll, the 1st Lady of Rockabilly, and credited as the 1st female rock n’ roll singer. I have yet to talk to her about these names being placed on her, but I will.

This Is...Not...Spinal Tap

Apr 17, 2012

So – in between cataloguing my jazz LPs, sorting through my ambient and classical discs, and listening to something really reflective by Eric Satie…it was a trip to a local grocer, where a friend offered up some tickets for something a bit different…Heavy frackin' Metal! Well, one band was. Two other bands were just good, hard, edgy rock. Refreshing. Then there was the headliner – Steel Panther!

A Big But and an Even Bigger Dinosaur

Apr 17, 2012

A big But? Yeah. I know. I spelled it wrong. If that’s what you were thinking. I’m thinking of Pee-wee’s Big Adventure. He had been dropped off at a roadside diner by Large Marge – a spectral truck driver. He was giving Simone, a waitress, some advice, and she said, “I know you’re right, Pee-wee, but…” He cuts her off with, “Everyone I know has a big 'But'. C’mon, Simone, let’s talk about your big 'But'”. Now, while they were chatting, they were looking out at the night sky – through the mouth of a large dinosaur.

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Latest From NPR:

Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies Tuesday — on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and Russia's use of "active measures" — before the House Intelligence Committee. Brennan is also expected to be questioned about the many leaks regarding national security issues since President Trump took office.

Brennan led the CIA during the Obama administration from 2013-2017. Prior to that, Brennan was a top counterterrorism and homeland security adviser to President Barack Obama.

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its blueprint calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth.

The administration plans to release what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday.

"This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters on Monday.

President Trump's full budget proposal for fiscal year 2018, to be released Tuesday, calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education. The cuts would be spread across K-12 and aid to higher education, according to documents released by the White House.

None of this can be finalized without Congress. And the political track record for Presidents who want to reduce education funding is not promising, even in a far less poisoned atmosphere than the one that hovers over Washington right now.

Student loans

President Trump asked two top U.S. intelligence chiefs to push back against the FBI's investigation into possible collusion between Russia and his presidential campaign, the Washington Post reported Monday evening.

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White House Proposes Deep Cuts To Safety Nets With 'Taxpayer First' Budget Plan

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its blueprint calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth. The administration plans to release what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday. "This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters...

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States Seek To Add Work Requirements To Medicaid

President Trump is expected to unveil a budget proposal Tuesday that includes $800 billion in cuts to Medicaid. The move comes as a number of states, including Louisiana and Maine, are considering a big change to the program already they want to add a work requirement , which has not been tried in the past. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with LaDonna Pavetti of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities about what the research tells us about the impact of work requirements. Also we hear...

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U.S. Commander: Toughest Fighting Lies Ahead In Mosul

The U.S. commander in charge of advising Iraqi troops says the most difficult part of the offensive to retake Mosul from ISIS will be the fight for the final neighborhoods held by the group. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Washington Post reporter Thomas Gibbons-Neff ( @tmgneff ), who has been in the city covering the offensive, which started last October. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics From NPR

In 'American Race,' Charles Barkley Is A True Believer In The Power Of Dialogue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgUCGo5kUXk That "American Race," the new TNT docu-series about race hosted by Charles Barkley, manages to illuminate some truths about the way Americans talk about race is largely accidental. Over its four episodes, the impolitic former NBA star travels to different parts of the country trying to dig into racial controversies that have bubbled up locally; at each stop, his insights don't go much beyond platitudes about America being made up of people from...

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West & Pacific Rim From NPR

Richard Oakes, Who Occupied Alcatraz For Native Rights, Gets A Birthday Honor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QNfUE7hBUc In November 1969, Richard Oakes and dozens of his fellow Native American activists came ashore at Alcatraz. The little island in San Francisco Bay had lain dormant since 1963, when its infamous federal prison had been shut down, and the group Oakes led set out to claim the land as its own. The Indians of All Tribes had a century-old legal basis: the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty between the U.S. and the Sioux and Lakota, which they said returned defunct...

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Education From NPR

Why It's So Hard To Know Whether School Choice Is Working

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm? Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It's hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students. Students are never randomly assigned to a...

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Science, Technology, and Medicine

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

It took an explosion and 13 pounds of iron to usher in the modern era of neuroscience. In 1848, a 25-year-old railroad worker named Phineas Gage was blowing up rocks to clear the way for a new rail line in Cavendish, Vt. He would drill a hole, place an explosive charge, then pack in sand using a 13-pound metal bar known as a tamping iron. But in this instance, the metal bar created a spark that touched off the charge. That, in turn, "drove this tamping iron up and out of the hole, through his...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

David Lynch's Trippy 'Twin Peaks' Revival Is A Love Letter To Hardcore Fans

[It should be obvious, but there are loads of spoilers below from the first four episodes of Twin Peaks: The Return. ] In a year that has brought us some pretty trippy TV so far, Showtime's Twin Peaks revival has managed to uncork the weirdest, wildest, most unfathomable four hours of television I have seen this year on a major media outlet. And for David Lynch fans, that's probably going to sound like heaven. First off, be warned: Those who know little about the world of Twin Peaks will have...

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Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

A new social network has grown quietly in recent months. It's called Gab, and its users are invited to #SpeakFreely — an appeal attractive to many members of the far right and others who feel their views are stifled by mainstream sites like Twitter and Facebook. Gab.ai was born not long before the election, a brainchild of a young CEO in a "Make America Great Again" hat, taking on what he calls "the Big Social" with a motto "Free Speech For Everyone." While Facebook and Twitter are attempting...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

If Raw Fruits Or Veggies Give You A Tingly Mouth, It's A Real Syndrome

If you have ever noticed an itchy or tingly sensation in your mouth after biting into a raw apple, carrot, banana or any of the fruits and veggies listed here , read on.
People who are allergic to pollen are accustomed to runny eyes and sniffles this time of year. But some seasonal allergy sufferers have it worse: They can develop allergic reactions to common fruits and vegetables. The allergic reactions — which are usually mild — can come on suddenly. And people can react to foods...

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Don't Worry, Your MP3s Are Safe: A Frank Discussion On The Future Of A Format

When you stream a song on Spotify, it's delivered in an audio format — imagine these formats to be containers as literal as a phonograph record — cheekily named "Ogg Vorbis." YouTube, one of the most popular music streaming "services" in the world by volume, prefers something called AAC, or "Advanced Audio Coding." Radio stations, whenever possible, tend to prefer lossless WAV files. If you've played music from your hard drive as far back as the early aughts or as recently as this morning,...

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Don't Be Fooled: 'Generation Wealth' Is More About Wanting Than Having

Plastic surgery, private jets, toddlers in designer clothes, magnums of champagne — Lauren Greenfield's 500-page photo collection , Generation Wealth , shows all of that. But this book isn't just about people who are wealthy, it's about people who want to be wealthy. I met up with Greenfield at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles, where there's an exhibit to accompany the new book. She says some of her early work was photographing kids here in LA, where she grew up. This...

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