Manchester Concert Bombing: What We Know Tuesday

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET A bombing at the end of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, has killed 22 people and injured 59 more, police say. Monday night's concert had drawn thousands of children and young people — many of whom were trying to leave when the blast hit. The bomber died at Manchester Arena, police say. Greater Manchester Police have identified Salman Abedi, 22, as the suspected suicide bomber. Earlier on Tuesday, police said they were trying to learn whether the...

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Former CIA Director Tells Lawmakers About 'Very Aggressive' Russian Election Meddling

Updated at 12:41 p.m. ET Former CIA Director John Brennan told the House Intelligence Committee Tuesday that Russia "brazenly interfered in the 2016 election process," despite U.S. efforts to warn them off. Brennan testified in an open session of the committee, one of a handful of congressional committee now investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Brennan said he told his Russian counterpart, the head of Russia's FSB, last August that if Russia pursued its efforts to interfere, ...

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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

"Addams Family" Comes to Riverside's Fox Theatre

Dec 11, 2013

KVCR's Ken Vincent talks with actor Blaire Anderson, one of the performers in the touring Broadway production of the stage musical, "The Addams Family," playing one night only, Thursday, Dec. 12, at the historic Fox Theatre in downtown Riverside.

David Fleming in conversation with Stray Cat Lee Rocker performing at the Historic Hemet Theatre. John Sheldon speaks to us about Through Wonderland at Crafton Hills. Also, Ron Berglass speaks with Paul Jacques about some seasonal theatre in the area. Ron also speaks with Alayna Via, director of the Citrus Valley High School performing arts department. 

San Manuel Philippines Donation

Nov 16, 2013

The San Manuel Band of Mission Indians has donated a total of one million dollars to help the people of the Philippines in the catastrophic aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. The American Red Cross and International Medical Core will each receive $500,000 to assist with humanitarian aid efforts. KVCR's Jhoann Acosta has more.

A University of California, Riverside professor has written a new series of books for children -- suitable for the classroom -- that aims to redefine the image and role of The Princess in children's literature. KVCR Matt Guilhem reports.

Native American Art Event This Weekend

Nov 8, 2013

Members of the Inland Empire tribes will be joining Native American tribes from all over the U.S. at a big Native American art and culture event in Los Angeles this weekend. Terria Smith with KVCR's First Nations Experience (FNX) worldwide TV channel reports.

David Fleming speaks with Shaelyn Blaney about JAMS (journey across musical scenes). Matt Gillum looks at UC Riverside STEM research. Terria Smith speaks with Jolie Proudfoot about the Native American Film Festival. John Sheldon in conversation with Tom Bryant, Director of Theatre at Crafton Hills College.

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In the first of three matches with the world's No. 1 Go player, a Google artificial intelligence program claimed victory Tuesday. It won the round by just a fraction of a point in Wuzhen, China, but the win was enough to leave its grandmaster opponent impressed and thoroughly confounded by the result.

Justice Dept. ethics experts have decided Robert Mueller can proceed as the special counsel leading the investigation into the Russian government's efforts to interfere in the 2016 election, despite his former law firm representing President Trump's daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

"Peace is a choice we must make each day," President Trump said during a visit to the West Bank city of Bethlehem, where he reiterated his resolve to help mediate a peace deal between the Israelis and the Palestinians and sounded upbeat about its prospects.

"The United States is here to help make that dream possible for young Jewish, Christian and Muslim children across the region," Trump said Tuesday as he stood alongside Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.

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White House Proposes Deep Cuts To Safety Nets With 'Taxpayer First' Budget Plan

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET. The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its proposal calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth. The administration released what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday. "This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick...

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States Seek To Add Work Requirements To Medicaid

President Trump is expected to unveil a budget proposal Tuesday that includes $800 billion in cuts to Medicaid. The move comes as a number of states, including Louisiana and Maine, are considering a big change to the program already they want to add a work requirement , which has not been tried in the past. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with LaDonna Pavetti of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities about what the research tells us about the impact of work requirements. Also we hear...

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Russia's Election Meddling Part Of A Long History Of 'Active Measures'

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET In 1983, an explosive story appeared in an Indian newspaper, The Patriot : the AIDS virus was the result of American biological weapons research. Two years later a Soviet newspaper picked up the thread: The U.S. Army had developed AIDS as a bioweapon at Fort Detrick, Md. Other publications followed suit and by 1986, an East German biology professor was publishing "research" in which he explained that the virus had been tested on service members used as human guinea...

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Politics From NPR

In 'American Race,' Charles Barkley Is A True Believer In The Power Of Dialogue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgUCGo5kUXk That "American Race," the new TNT docu-series about race hosted by Charles Barkley, manages to illuminate some truths about the way Americans talk about race is largely accidental. Over its four episodes, the impolitic former NBA star travels to different parts of the country trying to dig into racial controversies that have bubbled up locally; at each stop, his insights don't go much beyond platitudes about America being made up of people from...

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West & Pacific Rim From NPR

Richard Oakes, Who Occupied Alcatraz For Native Rights, Gets A Birthday Honor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QNfUE7hBUc In November 1969, Richard Oakes and dozens of his fellow Native American activists came ashore at Alcatraz. The little island in San Francisco Bay had lain dormant since 1963, when its infamous federal prison had been shut down, and the group Oakes led set out to claim the land as its own. The Indians of All Tribes had a century-old legal basis: the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty between the U.S. and the Sioux and Lakota, which they said returned defunct...

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Education From NPR

Why It's So Hard To Know Whether School Choice Is Working

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm? Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It's hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students. Students are never randomly assigned to a...

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Science, Technology, and Medicine

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

It took an explosion and 13 pounds of iron to usher in the modern era of neuroscience. In 1848, a 25-year-old railroad worker named Phineas Gage was blowing up rocks to clear the way for a new rail line in Cavendish, Vt. He would drill a hole, place an explosive charge, then pack in sand using a 13-pound metal bar known as a tamping iron. But in this instance, the metal bar created a spark that touched off the charge. That, in turn, "drove this tamping iron up and out of the hole, through his...

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

David Lynch's Trippy 'Twin Peaks' Revival Is A Love Letter To Hardcore Fans

[It should be obvious, but there are loads of spoilers below from the first four episodes of Twin Peaks: The Return. ] In a year that has brought us some pretty trippy TV so far, Showtime's Twin Peaks revival has managed to uncork the weirdest, wildest, most unfathomable four hours of television I have seen this year on a major media outlet. And for David Lynch fans, that's probably going to sound like heaven. First off, be warned: Those who know little about the world of Twin Peaks will have...

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Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

A new social network has grown quietly in recent months. It's called Gab, and its users are invited to #SpeakFreely — an appeal attractive to many members of the far right and others who feel their views are stifled by mainstream sites like Twitter and Facebook. Gab.ai was born not long before the election, a brainchild of a young CEO in a "Make America Great Again" hat, taking on what he calls "the Big Social" with a motto "Free Speech For Everyone." While Facebook and Twitter are attempting...

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Food, Nutrition, and Cuisine From NPR

If Raw Fruits Or Veggies Give You A Tingly Mouth, It's A Real Syndrome

If you have ever noticed an itchy or tingly sensation in your mouth after biting into a raw apple, carrot, banana or any of the fruits and veggies listed here , read on.
People who are allergic to pollen are accustomed to runny eyes and sniffles this time of year. But some seasonal allergy sufferers have it worse: They can develop allergic reactions to common fruits and vegetables. The allergic reactions — which are usually mild — can come on suddenly. And people can react to foods...

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Don't Worry, Your MP3s Are Safe: A Frank Discussion On The Future Of A Format

When you stream a song on Spotify, it's delivered in an audio format — imagine these formats to be containers as literal as a phonograph record — cheekily named "Ogg Vorbis." YouTube, one of the most popular music streaming "services" in the world by volume, prefers something called AAC, or "Advanced Audio Coding." Radio stations, whenever possible, tend to prefer lossless WAV files. If you've played music from your hard drive as far back as the early aughts or as recently as this morning,...

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Don't Be Fooled: 'Generation Wealth' Is More About Wanting Than Having

Plastic surgery, private jets, toddlers in designer clothes, magnums of champagne — Lauren Greenfield's 500-page photo collection , Generation Wealth , shows all of that. But this book isn't just about people who are wealthy, it's about people who want to be wealthy. I met up with Greenfield at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles, where there's an exhibit to accompany the new book. She says some of her early work was photographing kids here in LA, where she grew up. This...

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