We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

We continue our series, "State of the Cities," in which we're talking with Inland Empire mayors about how their cities are doing economically following the Great Recession. In this segment, KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palm Springs Mayor Steve Pougnet about how the growing stature of Palm Springs International Film Festival is affecting the city's recovering economy.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 3, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Dec 20, 2013

P-E Colmnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review some of the week's top news stories, including: -San Beranrdino County will no longer place "Immigration Holds" on undocumented immigrants with minor criminal convictions; -San Bernardino County will allow an exhibition of paintings to be displayed in a county building, in spite of complaints about images of female nudity; -a review of Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey's first year in office.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Dec 17, 2013

John Husing, the Chief Economist for the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, talks with KVCR's Ken Vincent about how the Federal Reserve controls inflation.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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