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Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Inland Empire Economist John Husing

Jan 14, 2014

In his weekly conversation with KVCR's Ken Vincent, Inland Empire Economic Partnership Chief Economist John Husing explains why government deficits are not always a bad thing.

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti

Jan 14, 2014

KVCR's Ken Vincent speaks with Palestinian Rights Activist Omar Barghouti, who will speak at UC Riverside today, urging support for his effort to get western nations --including the U.S. -- to boycott Israel, divest financial holdings that benefit Israel, and place sanctions on the Israeli government,  because of its treatment of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

San Bernardino Mayoral Candidates Differ on Issues

Jan 13, 2014

The two candidates competing for Mayor of San Bernardino in the February 4th election squared off in a League of Women Votes debate last week that stressed the differences between the candidates on important issues. KVCR's Matt Guilhem attended the forum and has a report. Photo Credit: LaFonzo Carter-San Bernardino Sun Staff Photographer

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff

Jan 10, 2014

Press Enterprise Columnist Cassie MacDuff and KVCR's Ken Vincent review a few of the top Inland Empire news stories of the past week, including: - Norco ("Horsetown USA") considers luring a horse-racing off-track betting facility to the city; - Orange growers fear the citrus psyllid may spell the end of Inland Empire groves; - Bus crashes like the one that killed eight people in Mentone last year are spurring a crackdown on tour bus companies.

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Latest From NPR:

Opponents of abortion rights have long argued that public funds for services like cancer screenings and contraception should go solely to health clinics that don't provide abortions.

An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that's mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

Prior to the 1920s, the U.S. had few restrictions on immigration, save for a few notable exclusions.

"Basically, people could show up," says Jeffrey Passel, of the Pew Research Center.

For workers in Mexico, crossing into the U.S. made a lot of economic sense, then and now.

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Michael Abrams is president of the Ohio Hospital Association. He's in Washington to talk to lawmakers about health care. And first, briefly, from what you've heard of the House Republican bill, is it an improvement over the Affordable Care Act?

Brazil's recession was already of historic proportions. Today, government figures confirm that it has grown even worse.

The economy last year actually dipped more sharply than expected. The national gross domestic product contracted by 3.6 percent in 2016, statistics agency IBGE said Tuesday.

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Special: Fresh Air with Terry Gross

Author Says Hitler Was 'Blitzed' On Cocaine And Opiates During The War

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Trump's International Policies Could Have Lasting Effects On Higher Ed

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Science, Technology, and Medicine

Autism And The Drive To Explain And Explore

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Arts, Culture, And Media From NPR

With Tempers Hot, A Gym Turns Off Cable News

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Food, Nutrition & Cuisine From NPR

3 Easy Pasta Recipes For Your Next Weeknight Dinner

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